Brassier, Grant: A Brief Return to Nature

There are staunch enemies of philosophies of nature, chief among them being mysticism, romanticism and the countless number of anthropic and theological thoughts creeping out the noetic morass of first causes. The theories of quantum mechanics can circumvent the notions of primary cause or primary mover, as following the works of Michio Kaku, the atoms to begin with could without the aid of any external agency start to bounce. Along such lines of thought Schelling, in his early period, focuses on forces and powers. One cannot feel a little stunned when Schelling describes the creation of the universe as a series of explosions in the First Outline.  As several critiques and tributes of/to Schelling show, it is his empirical inaccuracies (due to the time period mostly) and his later articulation of freedom which dominates and over writes the very possibility of nature philosophy. The central issue for nature philosophy becomes the tension between eliminativism and materialism (in the Žižekian/Badiouian/Lacanian sense) – between to what degree nature should be grounded without relying on a concept or structure which neither undermines the discoveries of contemporary science nor supports an anthropic view. But to return to nature philosophy – it seems that the process of realist eliminativism runs into the issue of emergence at some point and, with that conflict, the problem of freedom is reinserted into thought.

nuclear-winter

For Brassier, ‘Speculative’ is typically a philosophy that begins by drawing attention to the identification between thinking and being, or, mind and reality thereby repudiating empirical naturalism and Kantian critical philosophy. Brassier thinks that Meillassoux and Grant both lend legitimacy to this paradigm even if only for lending it a singular materialist twist. The latter two thinkers retain a flavor of the appearance-reality distinction albeit in different philosophical contexts. The philosophical context for Grant is primarily based on the distinction between natura naturata and natura naturans, while the one for Meillassoux is based on the distinction between the phenomenal and mathematical properties. Although, Grant’s philosophy flirts with materialism and when he says that ‘nature thinks’, it is not to be taken as an equivocation of thinking and being, but must be considered as a complication of idealism or as idealism being the realism about the idea. In this case, the opposition between materialism and realism is all about the former being concerned with the interior and the latter with the outer/exterior. The problem remains with the ‘Subject’- that which thinks the out there and the in here.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s