RAPL (Right Adjoint Preserve Limits) Theorem. Part 8b/End Part.

Fix a small category I and a diagram D ∶ I → C of shape I. Then the limit of D, if it exists, consists of an object l ∈ C and a natural isomorphism

Cone ∶ HomC(−,l) ≅ HomCI((−)I,D) ∶ Uni

in the category SetCop.

This is intuitively plausible if we recall the definition of limits. Recall that a cone under D consists of an object l ∈ C and a natural transformation Λ ∶ lI ⇒ D. We say that the cone (l,Λ) is the the limit of D if, for any other cone Φ ∶ cI ⇒ D, there exists a unique arrow υ ∶ c → l making the following diagram in CI commute:

img_20170214_201951_hdr

The map sending the cone Φ ∶ cI ⇒ D to the unique arrow υ ∶ c → l is the desired function HomCI (cI,D) → HomC(c,l). Furthermore, it’s clear that this function is a bijection since we can pull back any arrow α ∶ c → l to the cone Λ ○ αI ∶ cI ⇒ D. The main difficulty is to show that the data of naturality for these bijections is equivalent to the data of the canonical cone Λ ∶ lI ⇒ D.

Proof: First assume that the limit of D exists and is given by the cone (limID,Λ). In this case we want to define a family of bijections

Unic ∶HomcI(cI,D) →~ Hom (c,limID)

that is natural in c ∈ Cop. (Then the inverse Cone ∶= Uni−1 is automatically natural. So consider any element Φ ∈ HomCI(cI,D), i.e., any cone Φ ∶ cI ⇒ D. By the definition of limits we know that there exists a unique arrow υ ∶ c → limID making the following diagram commute:

img_20170214_203133_hdr

Therefore the assignment Unic(Φ) ∶= υ defines an injective function (recall that the functor (−)I is faithful, so that υ1I = υ2I implies υ1 = υ2). To see that Unic is surjective, consider any arrow α ∶ c → limID in C. We want to define a cone Φα ∶ cI ⇒ D with the property that Unicα) = α. By definition of Unic this means that we must have Φα ∶= Λ ○ αI — in other words, we must have α)i ∶= Λi ○ α indices i ∈ I. And note that this does define a natural transformation Φα ∶ cI ⇒ D since for all arrows δ ∶ i ∈ j in I we have

D(δ) ○ (Φα)i =D(δ) ○ (Λi ○ α)

= (D(δ) ○ Λi) ○ α

= Λj ○ α (Naturality of Λ)

= (Φα)j

We conclude that Unic is a bijection. To see that Unic is natural in c ∈ Cop, consider any arrow γ ∶ c1 → c2 in C (i.e., any arrow γ ∶ c2 → c1 in C). We want to show that the following diagram commutes:

img_20170214_204617

And to see this, consider any cone Φ ∶ cI1 ⇒ D. By composing with the natural transformation γI ∶ cI2 ⇒ cI1 we obtain the following commutative diagram in CI:

img_20170214_205052_hdr

Since the diagonal embedding (−)I ∶ C → CI is a functor, the bottom arrow is given by

(Unic1 (Φ))I ○ γI = (Unic1 (Φ) ○ γ)I

But by the definition of the function Unic2 this arrow also equals (Unic2(Φ ○ γI))I

Then since (−)I is a faithful functor we conclude that

Unic2 (Φ ○ γI) = Unic1 (Φ) ○ γ

and hence the desired square commutes. Conversely, consider an object l ∈ C and suppose that we have a bijection

Conec ∶HomC(c,l) ←→ HomCI(cI,D) ∶ Unic

that is natural in c ∈ Cop. In other words, suppose that for each arrow γ ∶ c1 → c2 in Cop (i.e., for each arrow γ ∶ c2 → c1 in C) we have a commutative square:

img_20170214_210335_hdr

We want to show that this determines a unique cone Λ ∶ lI ⇒ D such that (l, Λ) is the limit of D. The only possible choice is to define Λ ∶= Conel(idl). Now given any cone Φ ∶ cI ⇒ D we want to show that there exists a unique arrow υ ∶ c → l with the property Λ ○ υI = Φ.

So suppose that there exists some arrow υ ∶ c → l with the property Λ ○ υI = Φ. By substituting γ ∶= υ into the above diagram we obtain a commutative square:

img_20170214_210951_hdr

Then following the arrow idl ∈ HomC(l, l) around the square in two different ways gives

idl ○ υ = Unic(Conel(idl) ○ υI)

υ = Unic(Λ ○ υI)

υ = Unic(Φ)

Thus there exists at most one such arrow υ. To show that there exists at least one such arrow, we must check that the arrow Unic(Φ) actually does satisfy Λ ○ (Unic(Φ))I = Φ. Indeed, by substituting υ ∶= Unic(Φ) into the above diagram we obtain a commutative square:

img_20170214_211902_hdr

Then following the arrow idl ∈ HomC(l,l) around the

Conel(idl) ○ (Unic(Φ))I) = Conec(idl ○ Unic(Φ)) Λ ○ (Unic(Φ))I

= Conec(Unic(Φ))

Λ ○ (Unic(Φ))I = Φ

square in two ways gives as desired.

[Remark: We have proved that the limit of a diagram D ∶ I → C, if it exists, consists of an object limID ∈ C and a natural isomorphism

HomC(−, limID) ≅ HomCI((−)I,D) of functors Cop → Set. It turns out that if all limits of shape I exist in C then there is a unique way to extend this to a natural isomorphism

HomC(−,limI−) ≅ HomCI((−)I,−)

of functors Cop × CI → Set, and hence that we have an adjunction (−)I ∶ C ⇄ CI ∶ limI. However, we don’t need this result right now so we won’t prove it. Dually, the colimit of D, if it exists, consists of an object colimID ∈ C and a natural isomorphism HomC(colimID, −) ≅ HomCI(D, (−)I) of functors C → Set. If all colimits of shape I exist in C then this extends uniquely to an adjunction colimI ∶ CI ⇄ C ∶ (−)I. This explains the title of the previous lemma.]

Theorem (RAPL):

Let L ∶ C ⇄ D ∶ R be an adjunction and consider a diagram D ∶ I → D of shape I in D. If the diagram D ∶ I → D has a limit cone Λ ∶ lI ⇒ D then the composite diagram RI(D) ∶ I → C also has a limit cone, which is given by RI(Λ) ∶ R(l)I ⇒ RI(D).

Proof:

In this proof we will write limID ∶= l ∈ D, and we will just assume that the limit object limI RI(D) ∈ C exists. Now we want to show that the following objects are isomorphic in C : R(limID) ≅ limI RI (D). (We will ignore the data of the limit cone.)

So assume that L ∶ C ⇄ D ∶ R is an adjunction. Then we have the following sequence of bijections, each of which is natural in c ∈ Cop:

Homc(c, R(limID)) →~ Homc(L(c), limID) (L ⊣ R)

~ HomDI(L(c),D) (Diagonal ⊣ Limit)

~ HomDI (LI (cI),D)

~ HomCI(c,RI(D))

~ Homc(c,limIRI(D)) (Diagonal ⊣ Limit)

By composing these we obtain a family of bijections

Homc(c,R(limID)) →~ Homc(c,limI RI(D))

that is natural in c ∈ Cop. In other words, we obtain an isomorphism of hom functors HR(limI(D)) ≅ HlimI RI(D) in the category SetCop. Then since the Yoneda embedding H(−) : C → SetCop is essentially injective (from the Embedding Lemma), we obtain an isomorphism of objects R(limID) ≅ limI RI(D) in the category C.

 

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