Stock Hedging Loss and Risk

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A stock is supposed to be bought at time zero with price S0, and to be sold at time T with uncertain price ST. In order to hedge the market risk of the stock, the company decides to choose one of the available put options written on the same stock with maturity at time τ, where τ is prior and close to T, and the n available put options are specified by their strike prices Ki (i = 1,2,··· ,n). As the prices of different put options are also different, the company needs to determine an optimal hedge ratio h (0 ≤ h ≤ 1) with respect to the chosen strike price. The cost of hedging should be less than or equal to the predetermined hedging budget C. In other words, the company needs to determine the optimal strike price and hedging ratio under the constraint of hedging budget. The chosen put option is supposed to finish in-the-money at maturity, and the constraint of hedging expenditure is supposed to be binding.

Suppose the market price of the stock is S0 at time zero, the hedge ratio is h, the price of the put option is P0, and the riskless interest rate is r. At time T, the time value of the hedging portfolio is

S0erT + hP0erT —– (1)

and the market price of the portfolio is

ST + h(K − Sτ)+ er(T − τ) —— (2)

therefore the loss of the portfolio is

L = S0erT + hP0erT − (ST +h(K − Sτ)+ er(T − τ)—– (3)

where x+ = max(x, 0), which is the payoff function of put option at maturity. For a given threshold v, the probability that the amount of loss exceeds v is denoted as

α = Prob{L ≥ v} —– (4)

in other words, v is the Value-at-Risk (VaR) at α percentage level. There are several alternative measures of risk, such as CVaR (Conditional Value-at-Risk), ESF (Expected Shortfall), CTE (Conditional Tail Expectation), and other coherent risk measures.

The mathematical model of stock price is chosen to be a geometric Brownian motion

dSt/St = μdt + σdBt —– (5)

where St is the stock price at time t (0 < t ≤ T), μ and σ are the drift and the volatility of stock price, and Bt is a standard Brownian motion. The solution of the stochastic differential equation is

St = S0 eσBt + (μ − 1/2σ2)t —– (6)

where B0 = 0, and St is lognormally distributed.

For a given threshold of loss v, the probability that the loss exceeds v is

Prob {L ≥ v} = E [I{X≤c1}FY(g(X) − X)] + E [I{X≥c1}FY (c2 − X)] —– (7)

where E[X] is the expectation of random variable X. I{X<c} is the index function of X such that I{X<c} = 1 when {X < c} is true, otherwise I{X<c} = 0. FY(y) is the cumulative distribution function of random variable Y, and

c1 = 1/σ [ln(k/S0) – (μ – 1/2σ2)τ]

g(X) = 1/σ [ln((S0 + hP0)erT − h(K − f(X))er(T − τ) − v)/S0 – (μ – 1/2σ2)T]

f(X) = S0 eσX + (μ−1σ2

c2 = 1/σ [ln((S0 + hP0)erT − v)/S0 – (μ – 1/2σ2)T]

X and Y are both normally distributed, where X ∼ N(0, √τ), Y ∼ N(0, √(T−τ)).

For a specified hedging strategy, Q(v) = Prob {L ≥ v} is a decreasing function of v. The VaR under α level can be obtained from equation

Q(v) = α —– (8)

The expectations can be calculated with Monte Carlo simulation methods, and the optimal hedging strategy which has the smallest VaR can be obtained from (8) by numerical searching methods.

Optimal Hedging…..

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Risk management is important in the practices of financial institutions and other corporations. Derivatives are popular instruments to hedge exposures due to currency, interest rate and other market risks. An important step of risk management is to use these derivatives in an optimal way. The most popular derivatives are forwards, options and swaps. They are basic blocks for all sorts of other more complicated derivatives, and should be used prudently. Several parameters need to be determined in the processes of risk management, and it is necessary to investigate the influence of these parameters on the aims of the hedging policies and the possibility of achieving these goals.

The problem of determining the optimal strike price and optimal hedging ratio is considered, where a put option is used to hedge market risk under a constraint of budget. The chosen option is supposed to finish in-the-money at maturity in the, such that the predicted loss of the hedged portfolio is different from the realized loss. The aim of hedging is to minimize the potential loss of investment under a specified level of confidence. In other words, the optimal hedging strategy is to minimize the Value-at-Risk (VaR) under a specified level of risk.

A stock is supposed to be bought at time zero with price S0, and to be sold at time T with uncertain price ST. In order to hedge the market risk of the stock, the company decides to choose one of the available put options written on the same stock with maturity at time τ, where τ is prior and close to T, and the n available put options are specified by their strike prices Ki (i = 1, 2,··· , n). As the prices of different put options are also different, the company needs to determine an optimal hedge ratio h (0 ≤ h ≤ 1) with respect to the chosen strike price. The cost of hedging should be less than or equal to the predetermined hedging budget C. In other words, the company needs to determine the optimal strike price and hedging ratio under the constraint of hedging budget.

Suppose the market price of the stock is S0 at time zero, the hedge ratio is h, the price of the put option is P0, and the riskless interest rate is r. At time T, the time value of the hedging portfolio is

S0erT + hP0erT —– (1)

and the market price of the portfolio is

ST + h(K − Sτ)+ er(T−τ) —– (2)

therefore the loss of the portfolio is

L = (S0erT + hP0erT) − (ST +h(K−Sτ)+ er(T−τ)) —– (3)

where x+ = max(x, 0), which is the payoff function of put option at maturity.

For a given threshold v, the probability that the amount of loss exceeds v is denoted as

α = Prob{L ≥ v} —– (4)

in other words, v is the Value-at-Risk (VaR) at α percentage level. There are several alternative measures of risk, such as CVaR (Conditional Value-at-Risk), ESF (Expected Shortfall), CTE (Conditional Tail Expectation), and other coherent risk measures. The criterion of optimality is to minimize the VaR of the hedging strategy.

The mathematical model of stock price is chosen to be a geometric Brownian motion, i.e.

dSt/St = μdt + σdBt —– (5)

where St is the stock price at time t (0 < t ≤ T), μ and σ are the drift and the volatility of stock price, and Bt is a standard Brownian motion. The solution of the stochastic differential equation is

St = S0 eσBt + (μ−1/2σ2)t —– (6)

where B0 = 0, and St is lognormally distributed.

Proposition:

For a given threshold of loss v, the probability that the loss exceeds v is

Prob {L ≥ v} = E [I{X ≤ c1} FY (g(X) − X)] + E [I{X ≥ c1} FY (c2 − X)] —– (7)

where E[X] is the expectation of random variable X. I{X < c} is the index function of X such that I{X < c} = 1 when {X < c} is true, otherwise I{X < c} = 0. FY (y) is the cumulative distribution function of random variable Y , and

c1 = 1/σ [ln(K/S0) − (μ−1/2σ2)τ] ,

g(X) = 1/σ [(ln (S0 + hP0)erT − h (K − f(X)) er(T−τ) −v)/S0 − (μ − 1/2σ2) T],

f(X) = S0 eσX + (μ−1/2σ2)τ,

c2 = 1/σ [(ln (S0 + hP0) erT − v)/S0 − (μ− 1/2σ2) T

X and Y are both normally distributed, where X ∼ N(0,√τ), Y ∼ N(0,√(T−τ).

For a specified hedging strategy, Q(v) = Prob {L ≥ v} is a decreasing function of v. The VaR under α level can be obtained from equation

Q(v) = α —– (8)

The expectations in Proposition can be calculated with Monte Carlo simulation methods, and the optimal hedging strategy which has the smallest VaR can be obtained from equation (8) by numerical searching methods….

Sustainability of Debt

death scythe

For economies with fractional reserve-generated fiat money, balancing the budget is characterized by an exponential growth D(t) ≈ D0(1 + r)t of any initial debt D0 subjected to interest r as a function of time t due to the compound interest; a fact known since antiquity. At the same time, besides default, this increasing debt can only be reduced by the following five mostly linear, measures:

(i) more income or revenue I (in the case of sovereign debt: higher taxation or higher tax base);

(ii) less spending S;

(iii) increase of borrowing L;

(iv) acquisition of external resources, and

(v) inflation; that is, devaluation of money.

Whereas (i), (ii) and (iv) without inflation are essentially measures contributing linearly (or polynomially) to the acquisition or compensation of debt, inflation also grows exponentially with time t at some (supposedly constant) rate f ≥ 1; that is, the value of an initial debt D0, without interest (r = 0), in terms of the initial values, gets reduced to F(t) = D0/ft. Conversely, the capacity of an economy to compensate debt will increase with compound inflation: for instance, the initial income or revenue I will, through adaptions, usually increase exponentially with time in an inflationary regime by Ift.

Because these are the only possibilities, we can consider such economies as closed systems (with respect to money flows), characterized by the (continuity) equation

Ift + S + L ≈ D0(1+r)t, or

L ≈ D0(1 + r)t − Ift − S.

Let us concentrate on sovereign debt and briefly discuss the fiscal, social and political options. With regards to the five ways to compensate debt the following assumptions will be made: First, in non-despotic forms of governments (e.g., representative democracies and constitutional monarchies), increases of taxation, related to (i), as well as spending cuts, related to (ii), are very unpopular, and can thus be enforced only in very limited, that is polynomial, forms.

Second, the acquisition of external resources, related to (iv), are often blocked for various obvious reasons; including military strategy limitations, and lack of opportunities. We shall therefore disregard the acquisition of external resources entirely and set A = 0.

As a consequence, without inflation (i.e., for f = 1), the increase of debt

L ≈ D0(1 + r)t − I − S

grows exponentially. This is only “felt” after trespassing a quasi-linear region for which, due to a Taylor expansion around t = 0, D(t) = D0(1 + r)t ≈ D0 + D0rt.

So, under the political and social assumptions made, compound debt without inflation is unsustainable. Furthermore, inflation, with all its inconvenient consequences and re-appropriation, seems inevitable for the continuous existence of economies based on fractional reserve generated fiat money; at least in the long run.