Fréchet Spaces and Presheave Morphisms.

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A topological vector space V is both a topological space and a vector space such that the vector space operations are continuous. A topological vector space is locally convex if its topology admits a basis consisting of convex sets (a set A is convex if (1 – t) + ty ∈ A ∀ x, y ∈ A and t ∈ [0, 1].

We say that a locally convex topological vector space is a Fréchet space if its topology is induced by a translation-invariant metric d and the space is complete with respect to d, that is, all the Cauchy sequences are convergent.

A seminorm on a vector space V is a real-valued function p such that ∀ x, y ∈ V and scalars a we have:

(1) p(x + y) ≤ p(x) + p(y),

(2) p(ax) = |a|p(x),

(3) p(x) ≥ 0.

The difference between the norm and the seminorm comes from the last property: we do not ask that if x ≠ 0, then p(x) > 0, as we would do for a norm.

If {pi}{i∈N} is a countable family of seminorms on a topological vector space V, separating points, i.e. if x ≠ 0, there is an i with pi(x) ≠ 0, then ∃ a translation-invariant metric d inducing the topology, defined in terms of the {pi}:

d(x, y) = ∑i=1 1/2i pi(x – y)/(1 + pi(x – y))

The following characterizes Fréchet spaces, giving an effective method to construct them using seminorms.

A topological vector space V is a Fréchet space iff it satisfies the following three properties:

  • it is complete as a topological vector space;
  • it is a Hausdorff space;
  • its topology is induced by a countable family of seminorms {pi}{i∈N}, i.e., U ⊂ V is open iff for every u ∈ U ∃ K ≥ 0 and ε > 0 such that {v|pk(u – v) < ε ∀ k ≤ K} ⊂ U.

We say that a sequence (xn) in V converges to x in the Fréchet space topology defined by a family of seminorms iff it converges to x with respect to each of the given seminorms. In other words, xn → x, iff pi(xn – x) → 0 for each i.

Two families of seminorms defined on the locally convex vector space V are said to be equivalent if they induce the same topology on V.

To construct a Fréchet space, one typically starts with a locally convex topological vector space V and defines a countable family of seminorms pk on V inducing its topology and such that:

  1. if x ∈ V and pk(x) = 0 ∀ k ≥ 0, then x = 0 (separation property);
  2. if (xn) is a sequence in V which is Cauchy with respect to each seminorm, then ∃ x ∈ V such that (xn) converges to x with respect to each seminorm (completeness property).

The topology induced by these seminorms turns V into a Fréchet space; property (1) ensures that it is Hausdorff, while the property (2) guarantees that it is complete. A translation-invariant complete metric inducing the topology on V can then be defined as above.

The most important example of Fréchet space, is the vector space C(U), the space of smooth functions on the open set U ⊆ Rn or more generally the vector space C(M), where M is a differentiable manifold.

For each open set U ⊆ Rn (or U ⊂ M), for each K ⊂ U compact and for each multi-index I , we define

||ƒ||K,I := supx∈K |(∂|I|/∂xI (ƒ)) (x)|, ƒ ∈ C(U)

Each ||.||K,I defines a seminorm. The family of seminorms obtained by considering all of the multi-indices I and the (countable number of) compact subsets K covering U satisfies the properties (1) and (1) detailed above, hence makes C(U) into a Fréchet space. The sets of the form

|ƒ ∈ C(U)| ||ƒ – g||K,I < ε

with fixed g ∈ C(U), K ⊆ U compact, and multi-index I are open sets and together with their finite intersections form a basis for the topology.

All these constructions and results can be generalized to smooth manifolds. Let M be a smooth manifold and let U be an open subset of M. If K is a compact subset of U and D is a differential operator over U, then

pK,D(ƒ) := supx∈K|D(ƒ)|

is a seminorm. The family of all the seminorms  pK,D with K and D varying among all compact subsets and differential operators respectively is a separating family of seminorms endowing CM(U) with the structure of a complete locally convex vector space. Moreover there exists an equivalent countable family of seminorms, hence CM(U) is a Fréchet space. Let indeed {Vj} be a countable open cover of U by open coordinate subsets, and let, for each j, {Kj,i} be a countable family of compact subsets of Vj such that ∪i Kj,i = Vj. We have the countable family of seminorms

pK,I := supx∈K |(∂|I|/∂xI (ƒ)) (x)|, K ∈  {Kj,i}

inducing the topology. CM(U) is also an algebra: the product of two smooth functions being a smooth function.

A Fréchet space V is said to be a Fréchet algebra if its topology can be defined by a countable family of submultiplicative seminorms, i.e., a countable family {qi)i∈N of seminorms satisfying

qi(ƒg) ≤qi (ƒ) qi(g) ∀ i ∈ N

Let F be a sheaf of real vector spaces over a manifold M. F is a Fréchet sheaf if:

(1)  for each open set U ⊆ M, F(U) is a Fréchet space;

(2)  for each open set U ⊆ M and for each open cover {Ui} of U, the topology of F(U) is the initial topology with respect to the restriction maps F(U) → F(Ui), that is, the coarsest topology making the restriction morphisms continuous.

As a consequence, we have the restriction map F(U) → F(V) (V ⊆ U) as continuous. A morphism of sheaves ψ: F → F’ is said to be continuous if the map F(U) → F'(U) is open for each open subset U ⊆ M.

Conjuncted: Affine Schemes: How Would Functors Carry the Same Information?

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If we go to the generality of schemes, the extra structure overshadows the topological points and leaves out crucial details so that we have little information, without the full knowledge of the sheaf. For example the evaluation of odd functions on topological points is always zero. This implies that the structure sheaf of a supermanifold cannot be reconstructed from its underlying topological space.

The functor of points is a categorical device to bring back our attention to the points of a scheme; however the notion of point needs to be suitably generalized to go beyond the points of the topological space underlying the scheme.

Grothendieck’s idea behind the definition of the functor of points associated to a scheme is the following. If X is a scheme, for each commutative ring A, we can define the set of the A-points of X in analogy to the way the classical geometers used to define the rational or integral points on a variety. The crucial difference is that we do not focus on just one commutative ring A, but we consider the A-points for all commutative rings A. In fact, the scheme we start from is completely recaptured only by the collection of the A-points for every commutative ring A, together with the admissible morphisms.

Let (rings) denote the category of commutative rings and (schemes) the category of schemes.

Let (|X|, OX) be a scheme and let T ∈ (schemes). We call the T-points of X, the set of all scheme morphisms {T → X}, that we denote by Hom(T, X). We then define the functor of points hX of the scheme X as the representable functor defined on the objects as

hX: (schemes)op → (sets), haX(A) = Hom(Spec A, X) = A-points of X

Notice that when X is affine, X ≅ Spec O(X) and we have

haX(A) = Hom(Spec A, O(X)) = Hom(O(X), A)

In this case the functor haX is again representable.

Consider the affine schemes X = Spec O(X) and Y = Spec O(Y). There is a one-to-one correspondence between the scheme morphisms X → Y and the ring morphisms O(X) → O(Y). Both hX and haare defined on morphisms in the natural way. If φ: T → S is a morphism and ƒ ∈ Hom(S, X), we define hX(φ)(ƒ) = ƒ ○ φ. Similarly, if ψ: A → Bis a ring morphism and g ∈ Hom(O(X), A), we define haX(ψ)(g) = ψ ○ g. The functors hX and haare for a given scheme X not really different but carry the same information. The functor of points hof a scheme X is completely determined by its restriction to the category of affine schemes, or equivalently by the functor

haX: (rings) → (sets), haX(A) = Hom(Spec A, X)

Let M = (|M|, OM) be a locally ringed space and let (rspaces) denote the category of locally ringed spaces. We define the functor of points of locally ringed spaces M as the representable functor

hM: (rspaces)op → (sets), hM(T) = Hom(T, M)

hM is defined on the manifold as

hM(φ)(g) = g ○ φ

If the locally ringed space M is a differentiable manifold, then

Hom(M, N) ≅ Hom(C(N), C(M))

This takes us to the theory of Yoneda’s Lemma.

Let C be a category, and let X, Y be objects in C and let hX: Cop → (sets) be the representable functors defined on the objects as hX(T) = Hom(T, X), and on the arrows as hX(φ)(ƒ) = ƒ . φ, for φ: T → S, ƒ ∈ Hom(T, X)

If F: Cop → (sets), then we have a one-to-one correspondence between sets:

{hX → F} ⇔ F(X)

The functor

h: C → Fun(Cop, (sets)), X ↦ hX,

is an equivalence of C with a full subcategory of functors. In particular, hX ≅ hY iff X ≅ Y and the natural transformations hX → hY are in one-to-one correspondence with the morphisms X → Y.

Two schemes (manifolds) are isomorphic iff their functors of points are isomorphic.

The advantages of using the functorial language are many. Morphisms of schemes are just maps between the sets of their A-points, respecting functorial properties. This often simplifies matters, allowing allowing for leaving the sheaves machinery in the background. The problem with such an approach, however, is that not all the functors from (schemes) to (sets) are the functors of points of a scheme, i.e., they are representable.

A functor F: (rings) → (sets) is of the form F(A) = Hom(Spec A, X) for a scheme X iff:

F is local or is a sheaf in Zariski Topology. This means that for each ring R and for every collection αi ∈ F(Rƒi), with (ƒi, i ∈ I) = R, so that αi and αj map to the same element in F(Rƒiƒj) ∀ i and j ∃ a unique element α ∈ F(R) mapping to each αi, and

F admits a cover by open affine subfunctors, which means that ∃ a family Ui of subfunctors of F, i.e. Ui(R) ⊂ F(R) ∀ R ∈ (rings), Ui = hSpec Ui, with the property that ∀ natural transformations ƒ: hSpec A  → F, the functors ƒ-1(Ui), defined as ƒ-1(Ui)(R) = ƒ-1(Ui(R)), are all representable, i.e. ƒ-1(Ui) = hVi, and the Vi form an open covering for Spec A.

This states the conditions we expect for F to be the functor of points of a scheme. Namely, locally, F must look like the functor of points of a scheme, moreover F must be a sheaf, i.e. F must have a gluing property that allows us to patch together the open affine cover.

Ringed Spaces (1)

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A ringed space is a broad concept in which we can fit most of the interesting geometrical objects. It consists of a topological space together with a sheaf of functions on it.

Let M be a differentiable manifold, whose topological space is Hausdorff and second countable. For each open set U ⊂ M , let C(U) be the R-algebra of smooth functions on U .

The assignment

U ↦ C(U)

satisfies the following two properties:

(1) If U ⊂ V are two open sets in M, we can define the restriction map, which is an algebra morphism:

rV, U : C(V) → C(U), ƒ ↦ ƒ|U

which is such that

i) rU, U = id

ii) rW, U = rV, U ○ rW, V

(2) Let {Ui}i∈I be an open covering of U and let {ƒi}i∈I, ƒi ∈ C(Ui) be a family such that ƒi|Ui ∩ Uj = ƒj| Ui ∩ Uj ∀ i, j ∈ I. In other words the elements of the family {ƒi}i∈I agree on the intersection of any two open sets Ui ∩ Uj. Then there exists a unique ƒ ∈ C(U) such that ƒ|Ui = ƒi.

Such an assignment is called a sheaf. The pair (M, C), consisting of the topological space M, underlying the differentiable manifold, and the sheaf of the C functions on M is an example of locally ringed space (the word “locally” refers to a local property of the sheaf of C functions.

Given two manifolds M and N, and the respective sheaves of smooth functions CM and CN, a morphism ƒ from M to N, viewed as ringed spaces, is a morphism |ƒ|: M → N of the underlying topological spaces together with a morphism of algebras,

ƒ*: CN(V) →  CM-1(V)), ƒ*(φ)(x) = φ(|ƒ|(x))

compatible with the restriction morphisms.

Notice that, as soon as we give the continuous map |ƒ| between the topological spaces, the morphism ƒ* is automatically assigned. This is a peculiarity of the sheaf of smooth functions on a manifold. Such a property is no longer true for a generic ringed space and, in particular, it is not true for supermanifolds.

A morphism of differentiable manifolds gives rise to a unique (locally) ringed space morphism and vice versa.

Moreover, given two manifolds, they are isomorphic as manifolds iff they are isomorphic as (locally) ringed spaces. In the language of categories, we say we have a fully faithful functor from the category of manifolds to the category of locally ringed spaces.

The generalization of algebraic geometry to the super-setting comes somehow more naturally than the similar generalization of differentiable geometry. This is because the machinery of algebraic geometry was developed to take already into account the presence of (even) nilpotents and consequently, the language is more suitable to supergeometry.

Let X be an affine algebraic variety in the affine space An over an algebraically closed field k and let O(X) = k[x1,…., xn]/I be its coordinate ring, where the ideal I is prime. This corresponds topologically to the irreducibility of the variety X. We can think of the points of X as the zeros of the polynomials in the ideal I in An. X is a topological space with respect to the Zariski topology, whose closed sets are the zeros of the polynomials in the ideals of O(X). For each open U in X, consider the assignment

U ↦ OX(U)

where OX(U) is the k-algebra of regular functions on U. By definition, these are the functions ƒ X → k that can be expressed as a quotient of two polynomials at each point of U ⊂ X. The assignment U ↦ OX(U) is another example of a sheaf is called the structure sheaf of the variety X or the sheaf of regular functions. (X, OX) is another example of a (locally) ringed space.

Weyl, “To understand nature, start with the group Γ of automorphisms and refrain from making the artificial logical distinction between basic and derived relations . . .”

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Gauge transformations appear of primarily descriptive nature only if we consider them in their function as changes of local (in the mathematical sense) changes of trivializations. In this function they are comparable to the transformations of the coordinates in a differentiable manifold, which also seem to have a purely “descriptive” function. But the coordinate changes stand in close relation to (local) diffeomorphisms. Therefore the postulate of coordinate independence of natural laws, or of the Lagrangian density, can and is being restated in terms of diffeomorphism invariance in general relativity. Similarly, the local changes of trivializations may be read as local descriptions.

The question as to whether or not the automorphisms express crucial physical properties  has nothing to do with the specific gauge nature of the groups, but hinges on the more overarching question of physical adequateness and physical content of the theory. The question of whether or why gauge symmetries can express physical content is not much different from the Kretschmann question of whether or why coordinate invariance of the laws, respectively coordinate covariance description of a physical theory, can have physical content. In the latter case the answer to the question has been dealt with in the philosophy of physics literature in great detail. Weyl’s answer is contained in his thoughts on the distinction of physical and mathematical automorphisms.

Let us shed a side-glance at gravitational gauge theories not taken into account by Weyl. In Einstein-Cartan gravity, which later turned out to be equivalent to Kibble-Sciama gravity, the localized rotational degrees of freedom lead to a conserved spin current and a non-symmetric energy tensor. This is a structurally pleasing effect, fitting roughly into the Noether charge paradigm, although with a peculiar “crossover” of the two Noether currents and the currents feeding the dynamical equations, inherited from Einstein gravity and Cartan’s identification of translational curvature with torsion. The rotational current, spin, feeds the dynamical equation of translational curvature; the translational current, energy-momentum, feeds the rotational curvature in the (generalized) Einstein equation. It may acquire physical relevance only if energy densities surpass the order of magnitude 1038 times the density of neutron stars. By this reason the current cannot yet be considered a physically striking effect. It may turn into one, if gravitational fields corresponding to extremely high energy densities acquire empirical relevance. For the time being, the rotational current can safely be neglected, Einstein-Cartan gravity reduces effectively to Einstein gravity, and Weyl’s argument for the symmetry of the energy-momentum tensor remains the most “striking consequence” in the sense of  rotational degrees of freedom.

On the other hand, the translational degrees of freedom give a more direct expression for the Noether currents of energy-momentum than the diffeomorphisms. The physical consequences for the diffeomorphism degrees of freedom reduce to the invariance constraint for the Lagrangian density for Einstein gravity considered as a special case of the Einstein-Cartan theory (with effectively vanishing spin). Besides these minor shifts, it may be more interesting to realize that the approach of Kibble and Sciama agreed nicely with Weyl’s methodological remark that for understanding nature we better “start with the group Γ of automorphisms and refrain from making the artificial logical distinction between basic and derived relations . . . ”. This describes quite well what Sciama and Kibble did. They started to explore the consequences of localizing (in the physical sense) the translational and rotational degrees of freedom of special relativity. Their theory was built around the generalized automorphism group arising from localizing the Poincaré group.