Fascism’s Incognito – Conjuncted

“Being asked to define fascism is probably the scariest moment for any expert of fascism,” Montague said.
Communism-vs-Fascism
Brecht’s circular circuitry is here.
Allow me to make cross-sectional (both historically and geographically) references. I start with Mussolini, who talked of what use fascism could be put to by stating that capitalism throws itself into the protection of the state when it is in crisis, and he illustrated this point by referring to the Great Depression as a failure of laissez-faire capitalism and thus creating an opportunity for fascist state to provide an alternative to this failure. This in a way points to the fact that fascism springs to life economically in the event of capitalism’s deterioration. To highlight this point of fascism springing to life as a reaction to capitalism’s failure, let me take recourse to Samir Amin, who calls the fascist choice for managing a capitalist society in crisis as a categorial rejection of democracy, despite having reached that stage democratically. The masses are subjected to values of submission to a unity of socio-economic, political and/or religious ideological discourses. This is one reason why I call fascism not as a derivative category of capitalism in the sense of former being the historic phase of the latter, but rather as a coterminous tendency waiting in dormancy for capitalism to deteriorate, so that fascism could then detonate. But, are fascism and capitalism related in a multiple of ways is as good as how socialism is related with fascism, albeit only differently categorically.
It is imperative for me to add by way of what I perceive as financial capitalism and bureaucracy and where exactly art gets sandwiched in between the two, for more than anything else, I would firmly believe in Brecht as continuing the artistic practices of Marxian sociology and political-economy.
The financial capitalism combined with the impersonal bureaucracy has inverted the traditional schematic forcing us to live in a totalitarian system of financial governance divorced from democratic polity. It’s not even fascism in the older sense of the term, by being a collusion of state and corporate power, since the political is bankrupt and has become a mediatainment system of control and buffer against the fact of Plutocracies. The state will remain only as long as the police systems are needed to fend off people claiming rights to their rights. Politicians are dramaturgists and media personalities rather than workers in law.  If one were to just study the literature and paintings of the last 3-4 decades, it is fathomable where it is all going. Arts still continue to speak what we do not want to hear. Most of our academics are idiots clinging on to the ideological culture of the left that has put on its blinkers and has only one enemy, which is the right (whatever the hell that is). Instead of moving outside their straightjackets and embracing the world of the present, they still seem to be ensconced in 19th century utopianism with the only addition to their arsenal being the dramatic affects of mass media. Remember Thomas Pynchon of Gravity’s Rainbow fame (I prefer calling him the illegitimate cousin of James Joyce for his craftiness and smoothly sailing contrite plots: there goes off my first of paroxysms!!), who likened the system of techno-politics as an extension of our inhuman core, at best autonomous, intelligent and ever willing to exist outside the control of politics altogether. This befits the operational closure and echoing time and time again that technology isn’t an alien thing, but rather a manifestation of our inhuman core, a mutation of our shared fragments sieved together in ungodly ways. This is alien technologies in gratitude.
We have never been natural, and purportedly so by building defence systems against the natural both intrinsically and extrinsically. Take for example, Civilisation, the most artificial construct of all humans had busied themselves building and now busying themselves upholding. what is it? A Human Security System staving off entropy of existence through the self-perpetuation of a cultural complex of temporal immortalisation, if nothing less and vulnerable to editions by scores of pundits claiming to a larger schemata often overlooked by parochiality. Haven’t we become accustomed to hibernating in an artificial time now exposed by inhabiting the infosphere, creating dividualities by reckoning to data we intake, partake and outtake. Isn’t analysing the part/whole dividuality really scoring our worthiness? I know the answer is yes, but merely refusing to jump off the tongue. Democracies have made us indolent with extremities ever so flirting with electronic knowledge waiting to be turned to digital ash when confronted with the existential threat to our locus standi.
But, we always think of a secret cabal conspiring to dehumanise us. But we also forget the impersonality of the dataverse, the infosphere, the carnival we simply cannot avoid being a part of. Our mistaken beliefs lie in reductionism, and this is a serious detriment to causes created ex nihilo, for a fight is inevitably diluted if we pay insignificance to the global meshwork of complex systems of economics and control, for these far outstrip our ability to pin down to a critical apparatus. This apparatus needs to be different from ones based on criticism, for the latter is prone to sciolist tendencies. Maybe, one needs to admit allegiance to perils of our position and go along in a Socratic irony before turning in against the admittance at opportune times. Right deserves tackling through the Socratic irony, lest taking offences become platitudinous. Let us not forget that the modern state is nothing but a PR firm to keep the children asleep and unthinking and believing in the dramaturgy of the political as real. And this is where Brecht comes right back in, for he considered creation of bureaucracies as affronting not just fascist states, but even communist ones. The above aside, or digression is just a reality check on how much complex capitalism has become and with it, its derivatives of fascism as these are too intertwined within bureaucratic spaces. Even when Brecht was writing in his heydays, he took a deviation from his culinary-as-ever epic theatre to found a new form of what he called theatre as learning to play that resembled his political seminars modeled on the rejection of the concept of bureaucratic elitism in partisan politics where the theorists and functionaries issued directives and controlled activities on behalf of the masses to the point of submission of the latter to the former. This point is highlighted not just for fascist states, but equally well for socialist/communist regimes reiterating the fact that fascism is potent enough to develop in societies other than capitalistic ones.
Moving on to the point when mentions of democracy as bourgeois democracy is done in the same breath as regards equality only for those who are holders of capital are turning platitudinous. Well, structurally yes, this is what it seems like, but reality goes a bit deeper and thereafter fissures itself into looking at if capital indeed is what it is perceived as in general, or is there more to it than meets the eye. I quip this to confront two theorists of equality with one another: Piketty and Sally Goerner. Piketty misses a great opportunity to tie the “r > g” idea (after tax returns on capital r > growth rate of economy g) to the “limits to growth”. With a careful look at history, there are several quite important choice points along the path from the initial hope it won’t work out that way… to the inevitable distressing end he describes, and sees, and regrets. It’s what seduces us into so foolishly believing we can maintain “g > r”, despite the very clear and hard evidence of that faiIing all the time… that sometimes it doesn’t. The real “central contradiction of capitalism” then, is that it promises “g > r”, and then we inevitably find it is only temporary. Growth is actually nature’s universal start-up process, used to initially build every life, including the lives of every business, and the lives of every society. Nature begins building things with growth. She’s then also happy to destroy them with more of the same, those lives that began with healthy growth that make the fateful choice of continuing to devote their resources to driving their internal and external strains to the breaking point, trying to make g > r perpetual. It can’t be. So the secret to the puzzle seems to be: Once you’ve taken growth from “g > r” to spoiling its promise in its “r > g” you’ve missed the real opportunity it presented. Sally Goerner writes about how systems need to find new ways to grow through a process of rising intricacy that literally reorganizes the system into a higher level of complexity. Systems that fail to do that collapse. So smart growth is possible (a cell divides into multiple cells that then form an organ of higher complexity and greater intricacy through working cooperatively). Such smart growth is regenerative in that it manifests new potential. How different that feels than conventional scaling up of a business, often at the expense of intricacy (in order to achieve so called economies of scale). Leaps of complexity do satisfy growing demands for productivity, but only temporarily, as continually rising demands of productivity inevitably require ever bigger leaps of complexity. Reorganizing the system by adopting ever higher levels of intricacy eventually makes things ever more unmanageable, naturally becoming organizationally unstable, to collapse for that reason. So seeking the rise in productivity in exchange for a rising risk of disorderly collapse is like jumping out of the fry pan right into the fire! As a path to system longevity, then, it is tempting but risky, indeed appearing to be regenerative temporarily, until the same impossible challenge of keeping up with ever increasing demands for new productivity drives to abandon the next level of complexity too! The more intricacy (tight, small-scale weave) grows horizontally, the more unmanageable it becomes. That’s why all sorts of systems develop what we would call hierarchical structures. Here, however, hierarchal structures serve primarily as connective tissue that helps coordinate, facilitate and communicate across scales. One of the reasons human societies are falling apart is because many of our hierarchical structures no longer serve this connective tissue role, but rather fuel processes of draining and self-destruction by creating sinks where refuse could be regenerated. Capitalism, in its present financial form is precisely this sink, whereas capitalism wedded to fascism as an historical alliance doesn’t fit the purpose and thus proving once more that the collateral damage would be lent out to fascist states if that were to be the case, which would indeed materialize that way.
That democracy is bourgeois democracy is an idea associated with Swedish political theorist Goran Therborn, who as recent as the 2016 US elections proved his point by questioning the whole edifice of inclusive-exclusive aspects of democracy, when he said,
Even if capitalist markets do have an inclusive aspect, open to exchange with anyone…as long as it is profitable, capitalism as a whole is predominantly and inherently a system of social exclusion, dividing people by property and excluding the non-profitable. a system of this kind is, of course, incapable of allowing the capabilities of all humankind to be realized. and currently the the system looks well fortified, even though new critical currents are hitting against it.
Democracy did take on a positive meaning, and ironically enough, it was through rise of nation-states, consolidation of popular sovereignty championed by the west that it met its two most vociferous challenges in the form of communism and fascism, of which the latter was a reactionary response to the discontents of capitalist modernity. Its radically lay in racism and populism. A degree of deference toward the privileged and propertied, rather than radical opposition as in populism, went along with elite concessions affecting the welfare, social security, and improvement of the working masses. This was countered by, even in the programs of moderate and conservative parties by using state power to curtail the most malign effects of unfettered market dynamics. It was only in the works of Hayek that such interventions were beginning to represent the road to serfdom thus paving way to modern-day right-wing economies, of which state had absolutely no role to play as regards markets fundamentals and dynamics. The counter to bourgeois democracy was rooted in social democratic movements and is still is, one that is based on negotiation, compromise, give and take a a grudgingly given respect for the others (whether ideologically or individually). The point again is just to reiterate that fascism, in my opinion is not to be seen as a nakedest form of capitalism, but is generally seen to be floundering on the shoals of an economic slowdown or crisis of stagflation.
On ideal categories, I am not a Weberian at heart. I am a bit ambiguous or even ambivalent to the role of social science as a discipline that could draft a resolution to ideal types and interactions between those generating efficacies of real life. Though, it does form one aspect of it. My ontologies would lie in classificatory and constructive forms from more logical grounds that leave ample room for deviations and order-disorder dichotomies. Complexity is basically an offspring of entropy.
And here is where my student-days of philosophical pessimism surface, or were they ever dead, as the real way out is a dark path through the world we too long pretended did not exist.

Austrian School of Economics: The Praxeological Synthetic. Thought of the Day 135.0

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Within the Austrian economics (here, here, here and here), the a priori stance has dominated a tradition running from Carl Menger to Murray Rothbard. The idea here is that the basic structures of economy is entrenched in the more basic structures of human action as such. Nowhere is this more evident than in the work of Ludwig von Mises – his so-called ‘praxeology’, which rests on the fundamental axiom that individual human beings act on the primordial fact that individuals engage in conscious actions toward chosen goals, is built from the idea that all basic laws of economy can be derived apriorically from one premiss: the concept of human action. Of course, this concept is no simple concept, containing within itself purpose, product, time, scarcity of resources, etc. – so it would be more fair to say that economics lies as the implication of the basic schema of human action as such.

Even if the Austrian economists’ conception of the a priori is decidedly objectivist and anti-subjectivist, it is important to remark their insistence on subjectivity within their ontological domain. The Austrian economics tradition is famous exactly for their emphasis on the role of subjectivity in economy. From Carl Menger onwards, they protest against the mainstream economical assumption that the economic agent in the market is fully rational, knows his own preferences in detail, has constant preferences over time, has access to all prices for a given commodity at a given moment, etc. Thus, von Mises’ famous criticism of socialist planned economy is built on this idea: the system of ever-changing prices in the market constitutes a dispersed knowledge about the conditions of resource allocation which is a priori impossible for any single agent – let alone, any central planner’s office – to possess. Thus, their conception of the objective a priori laws of the economic domain perhaps surprisingly had the implication that they warned against a too objectivist conception of economy not taking into account the limits of economic rationality stemming from the general limitations of the capacities of real subjects. Their ensuing liberalism is thus built on a priori conclusions about the relative unpredictability of economics founded on the role played by subjective intentionality. For the same reason, Hayek ended up with a distinction between simple and complex processes, respectively, cutting across all empirical disciplines, where only the former permit precise, predictive, quantitative calculi based on mathemathical modeling while the latter permit only recognition of patterns (which may also be mathematically modeled, to be sure, but without quantitative predictability). It is of paramount importance, though, to distinguish this emphasis on the ineradicable role of subjectivity in certain regional domains from Kantian-like ideas about the foundational role of subjectivity in the construction of knowledge as such. The Austrians are as much subjectivists in the former respect as they are objectivists in the latter. In the history of economics, the Austrians occupy a middle position, being against historicism on the one hand as well as against positivism on the other. Against the former, they insist that a priori structures of economy transgress history which does not possess the power to form institutions at random but only as constrained by a priori structures. And against the latter, they insist that the mere accumulation of empirical data subject to induction will never in itself give rise to the formation of theoretical insights. Structures of intelligible concepts are in all cases necessary for any understanding of empirical regularities – in so far, the Austrian a priori approach is tantamount to a non-skepticist version of the doctrine of ‘theory-ladenness’ of observations.

A late descendant of the Austrian tradition after its emigration to the Anglo-Saxon world (von Mises, Hayek, and Schumpeter were such emigrés) was the anarcho-liberal economist Murray Rothbard, and it is the inspiration from him which allows Barry Smith to articulate the principles underlying the Austrians as ‘fallibilistic apriorism’. Rothbard characterizes in a brief paper what he calls ‘Extreme Apriorism’ as follows:

there are two basic differences between the positivists’ model science of physics on the one hand, and sciences dealing with human actions on the other: the former permits experimental verification of consequences of hypotheses, which the latter do not (or, only to a limited degree, we may add); the former admits of no possibility of testing the premisses of hypotheses (like: what is gravity?), while the latter permits a rational investigation of the premisses of hypotheses (like: what is human action?). This state of affairs makes it possible for economics to derive its basic laws with absolute – a priori – certainty: in addition to the fundamental axiom – the existence of human action – only two empirical postulates are needed: ‘(1) the most fundamental variety of resources, both natural and human. From this follows directly the division of labor, the market, etc.; (2) less important, that leisure is a consumer good’. On this basis, it may e.g. be inferred, ‘that every firm aims always at maximizing its psychic profit’.

Rothbard draws forth this example so as to counterargue traditional economists who will claim that the following proposition could be added as a corollary: ‘that every firm aims always at maximizing its money profit’. This cannot be inferred and is, according to Rothbard, an economical prejudice – the manager may, e.g. prefer for nepotistic reasons to employ his stupid brother even if that decreases the firm’s financial profit possibilities. This is an example of how the Austrians refute the basic premiss of absolute rationality in terms of maximal profit seeking. Given this basis, other immediate implications are:

the means-ends relationship, the time-structure of production, time-preference, the law of diminishing marginal utility, the law of optimum returns, etc.

Rothbard quotes Mises for seeing the fundamental Axiom as a ‘Law of Thought’ – while he himself sees this as a much too Kantian way of expressing it, he prefers instead the simple Aristotelian/Thomist idea of a ‘Law of Reality’. Rothbard furthermore insists that this doctrine is not inherently political – in order to attain the Austrians’ average liberalist political orientation, the preference for certain types of ends must be added to the a priori theory (such as the preference for life over death, abundance over poverty, etc.). This also displays the radicality of the Austrian approach: nothing is assumed about the content of human ends – this is why they will never subscribe to theories about Man as economically rational agent or Man as necessarily economical egotist. All different ends meet and compete on the market – including both desire for profit in one end and idealist, utopian, or altruist goals in the other. The principal interest, in these features of economical theory is the high degree of awareness of the difference between the – extreme – synthetic a priori theory developed, on the one hand, and its incarnation in concrete empirical cases and their limiting conditions on the other.

 

Archivals. NRx Corporate Serfs.

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Even if ‘The Road to Serfdom‘ by Friedrich von Hayek was a warning at one point, it has nor become a fact of history. Take the example of US, which is becoming more and more of a corporate serf to be exact, since the US is nothing but a big corporation, a formal structure by which a group of individuals agree to act collectively to meet some desired result. In the words of Mencius Moldbug,

It is not a mystic trust consigned to us by the generations. It is not the repository of our hopes and fears, the voice of conscience and the avenging sword of justice. It is just an big old company that holds a huge pile of assets, has no clear idea of what it’s trying to do with them, and is thrashing around like a ten-gallon shark in a five-gallon bucket, red ink spouting from each of its bazillion gills.

So what is needed is a reactionary or a radical to bring about social justice to confront us from becoming corporate serfs. Well, neither gets us any closer to achieving social justice, since we might be equal and still not more equal than others, the catch is we are not onto designing any abstract-utopia, but trying to make head and tail of the world that is screwed up. Can this be done via Formalism, which draws out a matrix of who has what, rather than who should have what, since the ‘ought’ alluded to in the latter is a simple recipe for violence. The matrix could at least draw attention to identify the real shareholders and stakeholders (The ‘We’, 99%, or what have you?), and in the process help reproduce the distribution as closely as possible to reach autonomous public ownership and eventually mitigate the risk of political violence imagined through either reactionary or radical means. Libertarianism it is.

Austrian Economics. Ruminations. End Part.

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Mainstream economics originates from Jevons’ and Menger’s marginal utility and Walras’ and Marshall’s equilibrium approach. While their foundations are similar, their presentation looks quite different, according to the two schools which typically represent these two approaches: the Austrian school initiated by Menger and the general equilibrium theory initiated by Walras. An important, albeit only formal, difference is that the former presents economic theory mainly in a literary form using ordinary logic, while the latter prefers mathematical expressions and logic.

Lachmann, who excludes determinism from economics since acts of mind are concerned, connects determinism with the equilibrium approach. However, equilibrium theory is not necessarily deterministic, also because it does not establish relationships of succession, but only relationships of coexistence. In this respect, equilibrium theory is not more deterministic than the theory of the Austrian school. Even though the Austrian school does not comprehensively analyze equilibrium, all its main results strictly depend on the assumption that the economy is in equilibrium (intended as a state everybody prefers not to unilaterally deviate from, not necessarily a competitive equilibrium). Considering both competition and monopoly, Menger examines the market for only two commodities in a barter economy. His analysis is the best to be obtained without using mathematics, but it is too limited for determining all the implications of the theory. For instance, it is unclear how the market for a specific commodity is affected by the conditions of the markets for other commodities. However, interdependence is not excluded by the Austrian school. For instance, Böhm-Bawerk examines at length the interdependence between the markets for labor and capital. Despite the incomplete analysis of equilibrium carried out by the Austrian school, many of its results imply that the economy is in equilibrium, as shown by the following examples.

a) The Gossen-Menger loss principle. This principle states that the price of a good can be determined by analyzing the effect of the loss (or the acquisition) of a small quantity of the same good.

b) Wieser’s theory of imputation. Wieser’s theory of imputation attempts to determine the value of the goods used for production in terms of the value (marginal utility) of the consumption goods produced.

c) Böhm-Bawerk’s theory of capital. Böhm-Bawerk proposed a longitudinal theory of capital, where production consists of a time process. A sequence of inputs of labor is employed in order to obtain, at the final stage, a given consumption good. Capital goods, which are the products obtained in the intermediate stages, are seen as a kind of consumption goods in the process of maturing.

A historically specific theory of capital inspired by the Austrian school focuses on the way profit-oriented enterprises organize the allocation of goods and resources in capitalism. One major issue is the relationship between acquisition and production. How does the homogeneity of money figures that entrepreneurs employ in their acquisitive plans connect to the unquestionable heterogeneity of the capital goods in production that these monetary figures depict? The differentiation between acquisition and production distinguishes this theory from the neoclassical approach to capital. The homogeneity of the money figures on the level of acquisition that is important to such a historically specific theory is not due to the assumption of equilibrium, but simply to the existence of money prices. It is real-life homogeneity, so to speak. It does not imply any homogeneity on the level of production, but rather explains the principle according to which the production process is conducted.

In neoclassical economics, in contrast, production and acquisition, the two different levels of analysis, are not separated but are amalgamated by means of the vague term “value”. In equilibrium, assets are valued according to their marginal productivity, and therefore their “value” signifies both their price and their importance to the production process. Capital understood in this way, i.e., as the value of capital goods, can take on the “double meaning of money or goods”. By concentrating on the value of capital goods, the neoclassical approach assumes homogeneity not only on the level of acquisition with its input and output prices, but also on the level of production. The neoclassical approach to capital assumes that the valuation process has already been accomplished. It does not explain how assets come to be valued originally according to their marginal product. In this, an elaborated historically specific theory of capital would provide the necessary tools. In capitalism, inputs and outputs are interrelated by entrepreneurs who are guided by price signals. In their efforts to maximize their monetary profits, they aim to benefit from the spread between input and output prices. Therefore, money tends to be invested where this spread appears to be wide enough to be worth the risk. In other words, business capital flows to those industries and businesses where it yields the largest profit. Competition among entrepreneurs brings about a tendency for price spreads to diminish. The prices of the factors of production are bid up and the prices of the output are bid down until, in the hypothetical state of equilibrium, the factor prices sum up to the price of the product. A historically specific theory of capital is able to describe and analyze the market process that results – or tends to result – in marginal productivity prices, and can therefore also formulate positions concerning endogenous and exogenous misdirections of this process which lead to disequilibrium prices. Consider Mises,

In balance sheets and in profit-and-loss statements, […] it is necessary to enter the estimated money equivalent of all assets and liabilities other than cash. These items should be appraised according to the prices at which they could probably be sold in the future or, as is especially the case with equipment for production processes, in reference to the prices to be expected in the sale of merchandise manufactured with their aid.

According to this, not the monetary costs of the assets, which can be verified unambiguously, but their values are supposed to be the basis of entrepreneurial calculation. As the words indicate, this procedure involves a tremendous amount of uncertainty and can therefore only lead to fair values if equilibrium conditions are assumed.

Austrian Economics. Some Ruminations. Part 1.

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Keynes argued that by stimulating spending on outputs, consumption, goods and services, one could increase productive investment to meet that spending, thus adding to the capital stock and increasing employment. Hayek, on the other hand furiously accused Keynes of insufficient attention to the nature of capital in production. For Hayek, capital investment does not simply add to production in a general way, but rather is embodied in concrete capital items. Rather than being an amorphous stock of generalized production power, it is an intricate structure of specific interrelated complementary components. Stimulating spending and investment, then, amounts to stimulating specific sections and components of this intricate structure. Before heading out to Austrian School of Economics, here is another important difference between the two that is cardinal, and had more do with monetary system. Keynes viewed the macro system as vulnerable to periodic declines in demand, and regarded micro adjustments such as wage and price declines as ineffective to restore growth and prosperity. Hayek viewed the market as capable of correcting itself by taking advantages of competitions, and regarded government and Central Banks’ policies to restore growth as sources of more instability.

The best known Austrian capital theorist was Eugen von Böhm-Bawerk, though his teacher Carl Menger is the one who got the ball rolling, providing the central idea that Böhm-Bawerk elaborated. For the Austrians, the general belief lay in the fact that production takes time, and more roundabout the process, the more delay production needs to anticipate. Modern economies comprise complex, specialized processes in which the many steps necessary to produce any product are connected in a sequentially specific network – some things have to be done before others. There is a time structure to the capital structure. This intricate time structure is partially organized, partially spontaneous (organic). Every production process is the result of some multiperiod plan. Entrepreneurs envision the possibility of providing (new, improved, cheaper) products to consumers whose expenditure on them will be more than sufficient to cover the cost of producing them. In pursuit of this vision the entrepreneur plans to assemble the necessary capital items in a synergistic combination. These capital combinations are structurally composed modules that are the ingredients of the industry-wide or economy-wide capital structure. The latter is the result then of the dynamic interaction of multiple entrepreneurial plans in the marketplace; it is what constitutes the market process. Some plans will prove more successful than others, some will have to be modified to some degree, some will fail. What emerges is a structure that is not planned by anyone in its totality but is the result of many individual actions in the pursuit of profit. It is an unplanned structure that has a logic, a coherence, to it. It was not designed, and could not have been designed, by any human mind or committee of minds. Thinking that it is possible to design such a structure or even to micromanage it with macroeconomic policy is a fatal conceit. The division of labor reflected by the capital structure is based on a division of knowledge. Within and across firms specialized tasks are accomplished by those who know best how to accomplish them. Such localized, often unconscious, knowledge could not be communicated to or collected by centralized decision-makers. The market process is responsible not only for discovering who should do what and how, but also how to organize it so that those best able to make decisions are motivated to do so. In other words, incentives and knowledge considerations tend to get balanced spontaneously in a way that could not be planned on a grand scale. The boundaries of firms expand and contract, and new forms of organization evolve. This too is part of the capital structure broadly understood.

Hayek emphasizes that,

the static proposition that an increase in the quantity of capital will bring about a fall in its marginal productivity . . . when taken over into economic dynamics and applied to the quantity of capital goods, may become quite definitely erroneous.

Hayek stresses chains of investments and how earlier investments in the chains can increase the return to the later, complementary investments. However, Hayek is primarily concerned with applying those insights to business cycle phenomena. Also, Hayek never took the additional step that endogenous growth theory has in highlighting the effects of complementarities across intangible investments in the production of ideas and/or knowledge. Indeed, Hayek explicitly excludes their consideration:

It should be quite clear that the technical changes involved, when changes in the time structure of production are contemplated, are not changes due to changes in technical knowledge. . . . It excludes any changes in the technique of production which are made possible by new inventions.

…….