Unique Derivative Operator: Reparametrization. Metric Part 2.

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Moving on from first part.

Suppose ∇ is a derivative operator, and gab is a metric, on the manifold M. Then ∇ is compatible with gab iff ∇a gbc = 0.

Suppose γ is an arbitrary smooth curve with tangent field ξa and λa is an arbitrary smooth field on γ satisfying ξnnλa = 0. Then

ξnn(gabλaλb) = gabλaξnnλb + gabλbξnnλa + λaλbξnngab

= λaλbξnngab

Suppose first that ∇ngab = 0. Then it follows immediately that ξnngabλaλb = 0. So ∇ is compatible with gab. Suppose next that ∇ is compatible with gab. Then ∀ choices of γ and λa (satisfying ξnnλa =0), we have λaλbξnngab = 0. Since the choice of λa (at any particular point) is arbitrary and gab is symmetric, it follows that ξnngab = 0. But this must be true for arbitrary ξa (at any particular point), and so we have ∇ngab = 0.

Note that the condition of compatibility is also equivalent to ∇agbc = 0. Hence,

0 = gbnaδcn = gbna(gnrgrc) = gbngnragrc + gbngrcagnr

= δbragrc + gbngrcagnr = ∇agbc + gbngrcagnr.

So if ∇agbc = 0,it follows immediately that ∇agbc = 0. Conversely, if ∇agbc =0, then gbngrcagnr = 0. And therefore,

0 = gpbgscgbngrcagnr = δnpδrsagnr = ∇agps

The basic fact about compatible derivative operators is the following.

Suppose gab is a metric on the manifold M. Then there is a unique derivative operator on M that is compatible with gab.

It turns out that if a manifold admits a metric, then it necessarily satisfies the countable cover condition. And then it guarantees the existence of a derivative operator.) We do prove that if M admits a derivative operator ∇, then it admits exactly one ∇′ that is compatible with gab.

Every derivative operator ∇′ on M can be realized as ∇′ = (∇, Cabc), where Cabc is a smooth, symmetric field on M. Now

∇′agbc = ∇agbc + gnc Cnab + gbn Cnac = ∇agbc + Ccab + Cbac. So ∇′ will be compatible with gab (i.e., ∇′agbc = 0) iff

agbc = −Ccab − Cbac —– (1)

Thus it suffices for us to prove that there exists a unique smooth, symmetric field Cabc on M satisfying equation (1). To do so, we write equation (1) twice more after permuting the indices:

cgab = −Cbca − Cacb,

bgac = −Ccba − Cabc

If we subtract these two from the first equation, and use the fact that Cabc is symmetric in (b, c), we get

Cabc = 1/2 (∇agbc − ∇bgac − ∇cgab) —– (2)

and, therefore,

Cabc = 1/2 gan (∇ngbc − ∇bgnc − ∇cgnb) —– (3)

This establishes uniqueness. But clearly the field Cabc defined by equation (3) is smooth, symmetric, and satisfies equation (1). So we have existence as well.

In the case of positive definite metrics, there is another way to capture the significance of compatibility of derivative operators with metrics. Suppose the metric gab on M is positive definite and γ : [s1, s2] → M is a smooth curve on M. We associate with γ a length

|γ| = ∫s1s2 gabξaξb ds,

where ξa is the tangent field to γ. This assigned length is invariant under reparametrization. For suppose σ : [t1, t2] → [s1, s2] is a diffeomorphism we shall write s = σ(t) and ξ′a is the tangent field of γ′ = γ ◦ σ : [t1, t2] → M. Then

ξ′a = ξads/dt

We may as well require that the reparametrization preserve the orientation of the original curve – i.e., require that σ (t1) = s1 and σ (t2) = s2. In this case, ds/dt > 0 everywhere. (Only small changes are needed if we allow the reparametrization to reverse the orientation of the curve. In that case, ds/dt < 0 everywhere.) It

follows that

|γ’| = ∫t1t2 (gabξ′aξ′b)1/2 dt = ∫t1t2 (gabξaξb)1/2 ds/dt

= ∫s1s2 (gabξaξb)1/2 ds = |γ|

Let us say that γ : I → M is a curve from p to q if I is of the form [s1, s2], p = γ(s1), and q = γ(s2). In this (positive definite) case, we take the distance from p to q to be

d(p,q)=g.l.b. |γ|:γ is a smooth curve from p to q.

Further, we say that a curve γ : I → M is minimal if, for all s ∈ I, ∃ an ε > 0 such that, for all s1, s2 ∈ I with s1 ≤ s ≤ s2, if s2 − s1 < ε and if γ′ = γ|[s1, s2] (the restriction of γ to [s1, s2]), then |γ′| = d(γ(s1), γ(s2)) . Intuitively, minimal curves are “locally shortest curves.” Certainly they need not be “shortest curves” outright. (Consider, for example, two points on the “equator” of a two-sphere that are not antipodal to one another. An equatorial curve running from one to the other the “long way” qualifies as a minimal curve.)

One can characterize the unique derivative operator compatible with a positive definite metric gab in terms of the latter’s associated minimal curves. But in doing so, one has to pay attention to parametrization.

Let us say that a smooth curve γ : I → M with tangent field ξa is parametrized by arc length if ∀ ξa, gabξaξb = 1. In this case, if I = [s1, s2], then

|γ| = ∫s1s2 (gabξaξb)1/2 ds = ∫s1s2 1.ds = s2 – s1

Any non-trivial smooth curve can always be reparametrized by arc length.

Bernard Cache’s Earth Moves: The Furnishing of Territories (Writing Architecture)

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Take the concept of singularity. In mathematics, what is said to be singular is not a given point, but rather a set of points on a given curve. A point is not singular; it becomes singularized on a continuum. And several types of singularity exist, starting with fractures in curves and other bumps in the road. We will discount them at the outset, for singularities that are marked by discontinuity signal events that are exterior to the curvature and are themselves easily identifiable. In the same way, we will eliminate singularities such as backup points [points de rebroussement]. For though they are indeed discontinuous, they refer to a vector that is tangential to the curve and thus trace a symmetrical axis that constitutive of the backup point. Whether it be a reflection of the tan- gential plane or a rebound with respect to the orthogonal plane, the backup point is thus not a basic singularity. It is rather the result of an operation effectuated on any part of the curve. Here again, the singular would be the sign of too noisy, too memorable an event, while what we want to do is to deal with what is most smooth: ordinary continua, sleek and polished.

On one hand there are the extrema, the maximum and minimum on a given curve. And on the other there are those singular points that, in relation to the extrema, figure as in-betweens. These are known as points of inflection. They are different from the extrema in that they are defined only in relation to themselves, whereas the definition of the extrema presupposes the prior choice of an axis or an orientation, that is to say of a vector.

Indeed, a maximum or a minimum is a point where the tangent to the curve is directed perpendicularly to the axis of the ordinates [y-axis]. Any new orientation of the coordinate axes repositions the maxima and the min- ima; they are thus extrinsic singularities. The point of inflection, however, designates a pure event of curvature where the tangent crosses the curve; yet this event does not depend in any way on the orientation of the axes, which is why it can be said that inflection is an intrinsic singularity. On either side of the inflection, we know that there will be a highest point and a lowest point, but we cannot designate them as long as the curve has not been related to the orientation of a vector. Points of inflection are singularities in and of themselves, while they confer an indeterminacy to the rest of the curve. Preceding the vector, inflection makes of each of the points a possible extremum in relation to its inverse: virtual maxima and minima. In this way, inflection represents a totality of possibilities, as well as an openness, a receptiveness, or an anticipation……

Bernard Cache Earth Moves The Furnishing of Territories

Cobordism. Note Quote.

Objects and arrows in general categories can be very different from sets and functions. The category which quantum field theory concerns itself with is called nCob, the ‘n dimensional cobordism category’, and the rough definition is as follows. Objects are oriented closed (that is, compact and without boundary) (n − 1)-manifolds Σ, and arrows M : Σ → Σ′ are compact oriented n-manifolds M which are cobordisms from Σ to Σ′. Composition of cobordisms M : Σ → Σ′ and N : Σ′ → Σ′′ is defined by gluing M to N along Σ′.

Let M be an oriented n-manifold with boundary ∂M. Then one assigns an induced orientation to the connected components Σ of ∂M by the following procedure. For x ∈ Σ, let (v1,…,vn−1,vn) be a positive basis for TxM chosen in such a way that (v1,…,vn−1) ∈ TxΣ. It makes sense to ask whether vn points inward or outward from M. If it points inward, then an orientation for Σ is defined by specifying that (v1, . . . , vn−1) is a positive basis for TxΣ. If M is one dimensional, then x ∈ ∂M is defined to have positive orientation if a positive vector in TxM points into M, otherwise it is defined to have negative orientation.

Let Σ and Σ′ be closed oriented (n − 1)-manifolds. An cobordism from Σ to Σ′ is a compact oriented n-manifold M together with smooth maps

∑ →i M i’←∑’

where i is a orientation preserving diffeomorphism of Σ onto i(Σ) ⊂ ∂M, i′ is an orientation reversing diffeomorphism of Σ′ onto i′(Σ′) ⊂ ∂M, such that i(Σ) and i′(Σ′) (called the in- and out-boundaries respectively) are disjoint and exhaust ∂M. Observe that the empty set φ can be considered as an (n − 1)-manifold.

One can view M as interpolating from Σ to Σ′. An important property of cobordisms is that they can be glued together. Let M : Σ0 → Σ1 and M′ : Σ1 → Σ2 be cobordisms,

0 →i0 M i1 ← ∑1             ∑1i’1 M i2 ← ∑2

Then we can form a composite cobordism M′ ◦ M : Σ → Σ by gluing M to M′ using i′ ◦ i − 1 : ∂M → ∂M′:

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